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555 Kings Hwy. East

Fairfield, CT 06825

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Keeping pets safe and healthy is our business

At Highway Animal Hospital, our mission is to ensure the good health and well-being of the pets of your family. Take advantage of some proactive ways you can enhance your pet’s health, happiness, and safety.

There are more than 700 indoor and outdoor plants containing toxic substances harmful to dogs and cats. If ingested, poisoning signs range from mild to severe – and some are fatal. Most houseplants have more than one name, so it’s important to confirm that yours are safe for pets.

 

For a full list of toxic and nontoxic indoor and outdoor plants, visit the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ASPCA) website at www.aspca.org or The Humane Society of the United States website at www.humanesociety.org.

 

Asparagus fern

Other names: emerald feather, emerald fern, sprengeri fern, plumosa fern, and lace fern

Toxic to: dogs and cats

Symptoms: vomiting, diarrhea, and abdominal pain

Repeated exposure: allergic dermatitis (skin inflammation)

 

Corn plant

Other names: cornstalk plant, dracaena, dragon tree, and ribbon plant

Toxic to: dogs and cats

Symptoms: vomiting (with or without blood), appetite loss, depression, and increased salivation

Specific to cats: dilated pupils

 

Dieffenbachia

Other names: dumb cane, tropic snow, and exotica

Toxic to: dogs and cats

Symptoms: oral irritation to the tongue and lips, increased salivation, difficulty swallowing, and vomiting

 

Elephant ear

Other names: caladium, taro, pai, ape, cape, via, via sori, and Malanga

Toxic to: dogs and cats

Symptoms: oral irritation, increased salivation, difficulty swallowing, and vomiting

 

Lilies

Specific lilies toxic to cats: Easter lily and stargazer lily

Signs / symptoms: vomiting, lethargy, lack of appetite, severe kidney failure, and death

Toxic to: dogs and cats: peace lily – also known as Mauna Loa

Symptoms: irritation to tongue and lips, increased salivation, difficulty swallowing, and vomiting

 

Cyclamen

Other names: sowbread

Toxic to: dogs and cats

Symptoms: increased salivation, vomiting, diarrhea, heart rhythm abnormalities, seizures, and death

 

Heartleaf philodendron

Other names: horsehead philodendron, cordatum, fiddle-leaf, panda plant, split-leaf philodendron, fruit salad plant, red emerald, red princess, and saddle leaf

Toxic to: dogs and cats

Symptoms: irritation to mouth, tongue, and lips, increased salivation, vomiting, and difficulty swallowing

 

Jade plant

Other names: baby jade, dwarf rubber plant, jade tree, Chinese rubber plant, Japanese rubber plant, and friendship tree

Toxic to: cats and dogs

Symptoms: vomiting, depression, ataxia (incoordination), and bradycardia (slow heart rate)

 

Aloe plant

Other names: medicine plant and Barbados aloe

Toxic to: dogs and cats

Symptoms: vomiting and reddish urine

 

Satin pothos

Other names: silk pothos

Toxic to: dogs and cats

Symptoms: irritation to mouth, lips, and tongue, increased salivation, vomiting, and difficulty swallowing

10 common plants pose dangers to cats and dogs

Pets require routine dental care from you and a veterinarian. Annual veterinary checkups are a must. Make an appointment if you suspect a problem. After an examination, your veterinarian may recommend professional teeth cleaning with anesthesia and pain medication. If dental disease is severe, we’ll recommend tooth extraction or other treatment.

 

Start brushing your pets’ teeth at home when they’re young. Introduce the process slowly and gently to acclimate them. Rub teeth and gums with soft gauze wrapped around your finger. Gradually switch to a special pet toothbrush or baby toothbrush with pet toothpaste. If your pet won’t tolerate brushing, we’ll recommend plaque-prevention alternatives.

 

Ways to prevent periodontal disease in your pet:

Preventive dental care

Without routine dental care, most dogs and cats develop periodontal (dental) disease, the most common health problem, by age 3. Providing routine dental care for your pet is easy and beneficial to pets’ oral and general health.

 

When left untreated, bacteria enter the bloodstream and can create problems for the heart, lungs, liver, and kidneys.

Signs of dental problems:

  • Bad breath

  • Sensitivity around the mouth

  • Loss of appetite

  • Yellow or brown deposits on the teeth

  • Bleeding, inflamed, and withdrawn gums

  • Loose or missing teeth

  • Pawing at the mouth or face

  • Difficulty chewing

  • Annual veterinary checkups

  • Brush teeth or use plaque-reducing products at least a few times a week

  • Feed dry food

  • Provide plaque-reducing foods, treats, and toys

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